Monday, November 12, 2012

Adrie Bezemer: The Wood Turner

When I stop to think about it, Astrid and I are so darn lucky!

Remember a couple of weeks ago when I told you about the wood turner we saw in our nearby Grote Kerk at the end of our Summer Festival here in Gorinchem: 

His name is Adrie Bezemer and this is his hobby after retirement.  He's 72.

After that post, Astrid sent him the link to these above collages.
He responded by inviting us to visit him at his home shop for a personal demonstration.

WE ARE NOT DUMB!  We did it a week ago, on November 3, 2012!

Adrie and his wife bought a huge farmhouse 30 years ago 
and remodeled it themselves over 16 years in the evenings and weekends.
In the back of the house, the former cow stable, is now Adrie's display studio and workshop.

Because we arrived by 10 a.m., and true to Dutch custom, we first had koffie break.
Adrie's lovely wife made sure we had plenty to eat and drink.
More Dutch you cannot get!

The wood-turning shop, adjacent to the studio, was a photo op for both of us!
You know how they say it's all about having the right tools!

When Astrid strings tennis rackets, she says she goes into her own zone.
Adrie said the same thing!  He truly was in his own zone.

And what did he make, you might ask?
He actually made TWO different goblets out of goudenregen (golden rain) wood.

The one on the right is mine, of which the Vimeo video below is made.
The one on the left is Astrid's, who chose the same wood but different design.

After the demonstration, Adrie burned the name of the wood 
and his signature into the bottoms of both goblets.
See the A3?  That's his signature.  A (ah) plus Drie (Dutch word for 3) = Adrie.
But A3 also looks like AB for Adrie Bezemer.  How clever is that!

Those 2 goblets were gratis, by the way!
My gift to Adrie in return is the following video, which he plans to add to his website.


Adrie Bezemer: The Wood Turner from Ginnie Hart on Vimeo.

And just before we left, after all our oohs and aahs, I bought a wood ballpoint pen that Adrie had on display in his studio.  Just call me a sucker for any writing utensils! Totally worth €15.

And yes, Adrie inscribed my name on the pen!
I picked out the pen that looked the most like oak wood, my favorite.
Guess what wood it was:  goudenregen.  Golden Rain.
The same wood as our goblets!

THANK YOU, Adrie Bezemer.  THANK YOU.

29 comments:

  1. What a great experience for you both! Wood is so wonderfully tactile, how lovely to have the beautiful goblets to remember your day by.

    As for you "making intro slides slower" - what programme to you use? If you use Windows Live Movie maker, it is possible to click on an image and put in the duration your require.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It was definitely a great experience, Anne. Defoinitely!

      Actually, I've only used Picasa thus far for my slide videos. Now you've got me curious about Windows Live movie maker, which I didn't even know existed! Thanks for the tip. I'll check it out.

      Delete
    2. Guess what, Anne. I figured it out, thanks to you, by using the Windows Live video maker. I decided to upload it as a Vimeo, instead of a YouTube. i hope it works for everyone!

      Delete
  2. Funny that I said on the other blog that you two were 'lucky' to do this and you start this one that way. You do the greatest show and tells and sometimes even do and tells (like the glassblower). A great job, as always, Ginnie.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Tou're a sweetheart, Cuidado. Yes, the synchronicity is delightful to me. Thank you. We really do feel lucky.

      Delete
  3. Your collages are so documentary, Ginnie. As far as I can see, you and Astrid interact with people around you a lot and are rewarded by such wonderful opportunities like this one.

    I love goblets made of any material, they look noble, don't they? It was interesting that while the machine was turning one couldn't see the structure of the wood and then suddenly - when the machine stopped - it was revealed. This particular wood shows very prominent graining.

    They say that the number of craftsmen has been gradually decreasing, everybody studies to gain better education and earn more money. It's quite understandable but what a pity.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have lived here now for 3 years, Petra, and feel like I've got to be one of the luckiest persons alive! There's always so much to see, even when we're just out joy-riding in the neighborhood.

      The good news about this wood turner is that he has a 12-yr-old grandson (the same age as mine in America!) who has a very keen sense about picking up this craft and can already turn wood. Wouldn't it be something if he goes to trade school and takes over his g'pa's business/hobby!

      Thank you for stopping by.

      Delete
  4. Ginnie these goblets are beautiful! You are a lucky one! This must have been such a wonderful afternoon. When I go to art shows I always stop at the wood crafters and wish that I could buy one more piece (but my house is too packed already.) There are so many great woods with different grains. When we stopped in Katakolon, Greece, there was a shop selling only olive wood items that they made themselves. I could not resist and bought a vinaigrette spoon set (well the one I have is ordinary wood and I bought it when I got married …45 years ago, so it was time for an update!)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have always loved wood, Vagabonde, especially the bowls made out of burls. They make such unique shapes. If I had been in the right place at the right time, I would have easily grabbed the opportunity to make them. So in that regard, this demonstration was like the next best thing, seeing a personal demonstration before my very eyes.

      I LOVE olive trees and have good memories of them in Greece!

      Delete
  5. We are lucky, Mary is right, oh so right. We are so lucky to meet unique people like Adrie. We were able to watch him create something fabulous, something we got to keep, as a reminder of that fabulous morning.
    With coffee with a cookie, more Dutch you cannot get.
    I am so proud of you that you figured that video, 3 full days and YES eindelijk... there it is.
    You have no idea how proud I am of you.
    Another memory to our rich life.
    IHVJ

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You have always been my biggest fan, for which I'm so thankful, of course. You saw me pulling my hair out...but it all paid off in the end. Picasa really needs to get its act together. It would be SO easy (from my limited perspective) to add a function to delay or speed up specific slides. DUH! Oh well, I'll still young enough to be in the learning curve. HA!

      Harstikke bedankt, MLMA. I love these memories we share!

      Delete
  6. and thank you, lady, for sharing all this! Such beautiful photos of such beautiful people and art ... I love that golden rain wood so much! Those goblets & your pen are priceless.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I 'spect this is totally up your alley there where you live, Susan. This is the kind of craft I'd love to get my hands on, to be honest. Thank you for stopping by.

      Delete
  7. Darn lucky is right! But at the same time you two are so approachable and genuine, how could they not like you two? Who wouldn't give you two treasures! This is amazing! Fabulous captures, you so know how to show a story!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. And you sure know how to make my day! Thank you, Robin. You're approachable like that, too, which is why you are loved by many!

      Delete
  8. Just incredible, Boots. Wow. And on top of it the farm, and such sweet people.

    Now I know where the koffie breaks on cottage workdays come from that Wilma and Jim are always promoting. ;)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh yes, Ruth, the farm. And now that you say that about Jim and Wilma, always promoting the koffie break, OF COURSE. Wilma is probably more Dutch than any of us realize. What a heritage.

      By the way, I just found out from Astrid recently that the morning break is called koffie break while the afternoon break is called tea break (so English, right?). I hadn't realized that distinction before! I learn something new every day. :)

      Delete
  9. what an incredible experience that must have been. there are very few craftsman nowadays.

    i love the goblets you both took home and the pen too. i too have a thing about pens - it's not freudian, promise!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I love it, Maria. Adrie has a 12-yr-old g'son who is taking up the trade, so maybe in this family the craft will not die out! That would be great.

      Don't you love all the bridges we have to cross over to each other?! :)

      Delete
  10. 72 years young! What a talent, what an artist. I love that the shavings get on his hands. I will have to hop on over to his website... I'd love a serving spoon set. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I don't see he makes spoons or measuring cups. Loved the candlesticks, but I really don't need any more...

      Delete
    2. Hmmm. Good question about serving spoons, Margaret. Maybe we'll ask him. You mean the kind you use for salads? Wouldn't that be fun. But measuring cups? I have to laugh about that because they use different measurements here in Europe. But still, that would be an idea, too. Hmmmm.

      Delete
    3. HA! I just asked Astrid about this and she said something I hadn't thought about: he TURNS wood and doesn't carve it. So that would rule out spoons and measuring cups (which are American, Astrid said). Rats.

      Delete
    4. Yikes. I was one that NEVER learned the metric system. Ha! Perhaps I'd have an excuse for "meals gone bad"? :) Serving spoons... I always think they look so elegant.

      Delete
    5. Right...the metric system. And believe it or not, when Astrid cooks her spinach tart, she gets out her scales to measure the flour. They don't use measuring cups. Well, actually, the last time she did it, I had her figure out what the measurement was with my measuring cups so she doesn't have to use her scales again! Seriously. It boggles the mind.

      And yes, wooden serving spoons ARE so elegant. Too bad they aren't "turned!"

      Delete
    6. Scales.... not measuring cups. Ah, but I can imagine some of those scales are beautiful.

      Delete
    7. In case you missed this last year, here's Astrid's scales:
      http://ginniehart.blogspot.nl/2011/06/pentecost-birthday.html

      Can you imagine measuring like that????

      Delete
  11. I spent quite a lot of time with this post... my father was a journeyman carpenter by trade (he learned from my grandfather who was his father-in-law) and I have always had a fascination with wood. I have a burl bowl from a local wood artist and several other wooden pieces including a beautiful wood beer stein! When I was renovating my kitchen 12 years ago, I wanted oak kitchen cabinets. The lady who worked at the supply house my contractor recommended for kitchen cabinets tried to talk me out of oak cabinets because "the wood had too much grain" and wasn't "in fashion" at the time. Well, it was what I wanted and is what I have. (what is "in fashion" has never mattered much to me) Your video is fantastic! I'm glad you spent the time to learn what you needed to do it the way you wanted it to be done instead of accepting the limitations of Picasa!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You sure know how to make my day, dear lady. Oak is my favorite wood, too, but you already know that. I'm so glad you stuck to your guns for your kitchen cabinets! I would have done the same. And thanks for your compliment on the video. I'm so glad I found Vimeo. It was actually very user-friendly!

      Delete